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Modern Technology makes a monkey control a robot with its thoughts ( Mojo Jojo 2013).

posted 18 Feb 2013, 12:07 by Manish Abraham   [ updated 19 Feb 2013, 08:07 ]



When I was a kid I used to watch Mojo Jojo and think can Monkeys control any thing with their brains, now it feels as if the imagination is coming true.
Miguel Nicolelis explores the limits of the brain-machine interface.



Can we use our brains to directly control machines - without requiring a body as the middleman ? 

Miguel Nicolelis talks through an astonishing experiment, in which a clever monkey in the US learns to control a monkey avatar, and then a robot arm in Japan, purely with its thoughts. The research has big implications for quadraplegic people and maybe for all of us.
Miguel Nicolelis is best known for pioneering studies in neuronal population 
coding, Brain Machine Interfaces (BMI) and neuroprosthetics in human patients and non-human primates. This lab has also developed an integrative approach to studying neurological and psychiatric disorders including Parkinsons disease and epilepsy. The approach, they hope, will allow the integration of molecular, cellular, systems, and behavioral data in the same animal, producing a more complete understanding of the nature of the neurophysiological alterations associated with these disorders.




In an another remarkable demonstration of brain-machine interface technology, other researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have taught a monkey to use just its thoughts to control an advanced robotic arm and perform elaborate maneuvers with it.

monkey controls robots

It's not the first time a monkey with sensors implanted in its brains has controlled machines with its mind. But this seven-degrees-of-freedom robot arm is probably the most complex system a monkey has ever mastered with its thoughts alone.

Researchers have long been working to put the brain in direct communication with machines. The hope is one day brain-machine interfaces will allow paralyzed people to operate advanced prosthetics in a natural way. Recent demonstrations have seen animals and humans controlling ever more complex devices.

But the experiments at the University of Pittsburgh, led by Dr. Andrew Schwartz, a professor of neurobiology, appear to involve an unprecedented degree of complexity in terms of the robotic arm, the level of control, and the difficulty of the manipulations demonstrated. Watch:

The video above shows the experiment. Note the monkey on the right side of the screen. It uses its right arm to tap a button. (Its left arm is gently restrained inside a tube). This triggers the robotic manipulator labeled DENSO [left side of the screen] to position a black knob at an arbitrary point in space. The monkey then controls its articulated robotic arm to grasp the knob.

In this experiment, the monkey received two brain implants: one in the hand area and another in the arm area of its motor cortex. The implants monitor the firing of motor neurons and send this data to a computer, which translates the patterns into commands for the robotic arm.

In a previous study few years ago, Dr. Schwartz and his team taught a macaque to control a simpler mechanical arm to feed itself. This was a four-degrees-of-freedom arm with shoulder joints, an elbow, and a simple gripper.

Now the researchers have added three more degrees of freedom by adding an articulated wrist, which can perform roll, pitch and yaw movements. And the arm itself was replaced by a larger and nimbler manipulator. Although the video doesn't show it, the monkey can not only touch the knob but also precisely turn it by rotating the mechanical wrist.

Photo and video: Dr. Andrew Schwartz/University of Pittsburgh, Ted Talks ,Miguel Nicolelis